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Friday, January 31, 2020 | History

6 edition of Ganesh Pyne, his life and times found in the catalog.

Ganesh Pyne, his life and times

Ella Datta

Ganesh Pyne, his life and times

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Published by Centre for International Modern Art in Calcutta .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pāina, Gaṇeśa, 1937- -- Criticism and interpretation.

  • About the Edition

    Biography of Gaṇeśa Pāina, b. 1937, eminent Indian painter; includes reproductions of some paintings.

    Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 117).

    StatementElla Datta ; edited by Sathi Basu.
    ContributionsBasu, Sathi., Pāina, Gaṇeśa, 1937-, Centre for International Modern Art (Calcutta, India)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsND1010.P35 D38 1998
    The Physical Object
    Pagination118 p. :
    Number of Pages118
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL508460M
    ISBN 108187266007
    LC Control Number98906208
    OCLC/WorldCa39733600

    Diverse influence shaped him in his growing years. As far as his personal life was concerned, Pyne went on looking for a job and the replies to his applications were always predictably a regret letter. Financially, I am better off. References News: His dark materials.

    Pyne began using tempera as his primary medium in the mids and his experiments with indigenous powder pigments and various binding agents allowed him to develop a unique way of building up surface and texture on canvas and create a dream-like atmosphere in his works. He also grew up on stories told by his grandmother fold stories, mythological stories, and fairy tales. Bikash Bhattacharjee, stimulated though he was by private symbolism like Pyne, is really focused on a strategy of acerbic social commentary. Even a genius like Satyajit Ray, for example, invented a happy ending for his Ganashatru which deviated from the Ibsen original in identifying people power as the ultimate redemption. Initially, Pyne painted watercolors and sketches of misty mornings and wayside temples, variously influenced as he was by Walt Disney and the art of Abanindranath Tagore. This change of preferred medium evolves in parallel to a change of palette, as well as a change in his style of figuration.

    This financial concern led him to reject the more expensive imported paints and to experiment with his own form of tempera. For some time since the late fifties, the artist had been attempting to form groups. Collectors, gallery owners and business magnets vied with one another to shore up their repository of art works. He replaced the transparent medium of watercolour with, first ink, then gouache, and later tempera.


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Ganesh Pyne, his life and times book

Equally devoted to cinema as he is to painting, Pyne has also drawn inspirations from movies made by Fellini and Ingmar Bergman. His treatment of light and the subdued palette presided over by beige and inflected browns — matte, textured or strangely radiant — with startling insertions of dense blues and red-maroons, weave a precarious evanescence into the images, insinuate the sinister, predict doom.

Its preliminary sketches, scratches and observations trace the fraught journey a creator must undertake battling doubts, unease and the elusive muse of the imagination.

In fact, he is one of the very few artists in Bengal who could bridge the hiatus between the world of words and the world of images. He plays with different approaches, furiously scratches out the ones that displease him, until the imagery and narrative is fully realized in the still surface of the tempera.

Feeling a little blue, he took a tram home. Instead of precise blocks of colour, there are overlapping layers.

But the person who coloured the deepest core of his being is his grandmother, Nandarani. Pyne began using tempera as his primary medium in the mids and his experiments with indigenous powder pigments and various binding agents allowed him to develop a unique way of building up surface and texture on canvas and create a dream-like atmosphere in his works.

However, his style soon evolved away from the gentle watercolours of his early career towards a more modernist vocabulary.

This financial concern led him to reject the more expensive imported paints and to experiment with his own form of tempera. This trauma at age 9, had a lasting impact on his life and work. He would watch carefully the students at work. Instead, there are amber browns and ashy blues.

The collector spent several hours with the reclusive artist in his studio, always meeting him alone, and developed an intimate personal relationship with him. They were interested in the happenings of the time they belonged to. During the Great Calcutta Killings ofwhen Pyne was nine years old, he looked too closely at violence and bloodshed.

His obsession with the iconography of goddess Durga probably harks back to this aspect of his career. As he roamed around the city, he stumbled upon a pile of dead bodies.

But I have always resisted defeat in life. Primary colours are rare in Pyne's universe. Instead of depicting the grand moments, Pyne chose to paint peripheral characters, such as the archer Ekalavya, who cut off his thumb to please his teacher, and the princess Amba who was reincarnated as a man so that she could take revenge on the warrior who kidnapped her.

This was also the period of experimentation.

Ganesh Pyne Explained

Share via Email Ganesh Pyne painted a series depicting the characters of the Indian epic the Mahabharata. Jogen Chowdhury, who does indeed dwell on dark themes, also casts his gaze outwards as a satiric critic.

Exhibitions Download PDF The foremost exponent of Bengal School of Art Ganesh Pyne has blended romanticism, fantasy and inventive play of light and dark in his works wherein the labyrinths of subconscious have formulated the imagery of his paintings. He discarded pure naturalism and evolved a distinctive visual language gradually.

He his life and times book Hals Rembrandt and Paul Klee as the other influences.Ganesh Pyne is obsessed with death. He can't forget his first brush with death, in the summer ofwhen communal riots had rocked Kolkata. His family was forced out of their crumbling mansion.

As he roamed around the city, he stumbled upon a pile of dead bodies. On the top was the body of a stark naked old woman, with wounds on her breast. Dec 19,  · Here a rag doll or a toy horse has a life of its own and in combination with human figures convey with poignance the vulnerability and resurgence of the human spirit." (E.

Datta, Ganesh Pyne: His Life and Times, CIMA Gallery, Kolkata,p. 17) Ganesh Pyne was initially influenced by Abanindranath and Gaganendranath Tagore, of the Bengal School.

Email this Article Ganesh Pyne. 'Thirst of a Minstrel: The Life and Times of Ganesh Pyne' a book authored by Shiladitya Sarkar (New Delhi, Rupa and Co., ) explores the artist's mind, myths and metaphors. It brings out incidents and factors that had a bearing on Pyne's developing personality and more importantly, on his work, which persistently retains an aura of brooding sadness and nostalgia.

In her study, Ganesh Pyne: His Life And Times, critic and curator Ella Datta notes Pyne’s resistance to the idea of exposing these private musings to the public eye. But once he was persuaded Author: Somak Ghoshal. Ganesh Pyne (Bengali: গণেশ পাইন) (11 June – 12 March ) was an Indian painter and draughtsman, born in Kolkata, West Bengal.

Pyne is one of the most notable contemporary artists of the Bengal School of Art, who had also developed his own style of Education: Government College of Art & Craft.